Sunday, November 20, 2016

JAMES MATTIS -- The General Does Fallujah, 2004--"THEY WILL BE SAFER--"

TO CMD COC
FROMPVT JC, SCULLERY, H&S,
SUBJ IT WOULD BE SAFER...

(LZ 410)-- Following extracted from the archives--


CHICAGO TRIBUNE  (05/11/04)--


Mattis greeted Iraqi police Capt. Hammed al Ayash with a handshake and then placed his right hand over his heart in the Arab gesture of friendship. "If we send engineers into the city to repair damage, would they be safe?"Kattis asked. "Or would we need-to have fighting forces there to protect them?" "They will be safer if you don't send a fighting force with them," al Ayash replied.

THE REST OF THE ARTICLE--











FWD SENATE CONFIRMATION HEARINGS--CHECK PERIMETER DETAIL ROSTER...










Friday, July 22, 2016

BURY ME ON HILL 861--By Pvt JC Langelle, USMC--(c) 1968

Bury Me on Hill 861

Bury me on Hill 861, up near the town of Khe Sanh
Where the mortars are a blazin', some Hell we'll be raisin'
Shootin' NVA and Viet Cong.

Don't want to go back to the world, got a Dear John letter from my girl
Right now I'm feelin' partial 'bout goin' back to Camp Marshall
Sign me up for another whirl.

Up there on the DMZ, that's where they can bury me.
I'll take all my lumps away from stateside chumps back in the Land of the Free.

Bury me in the town of Fubai, mine is not to wonder, do or die.
I'll take with me some Commies, we'll all have weeping mommies,
Mine is not to wonder, Semper Fi.

When rockets will be fallin' on DaNang; in my heart, I know I'll feel a pang,
For girls who sent no letter, the ones who think they're better
And my telephone it never rang.

Bury me on Hill 861, put a cross on it when you're done.
And if it ain't no bother, send a letter to my mother
And tell her where you buried her son.



Wednesday, April 13, 2016

PERFUME RIVER--Tet Angst--THE CITADEL, 1/27, HUE CITY 1968

TO CMD COC, 27TH RLT
FROM HILL 55 RADIO RELAY
SUBJ  NEW NAM FLICK--

FOLLOWING SITREP FILED--

http://variety.com/2016/film/news/alcon-vietnam-war-moive-perfume-river-1201751852/

Alcon Developing Vietnam War Drama ‘Perfume River’

Alcon Entertainment is developing the Vietnam War spy drama “Perfume River,” based on the events surrounding the 1968 Tet Offensive.

Alcon has optioned the life story rights of Vietnam veteran and former Marine first lieutenant Alexander Wells. The screenplay is being written by Stephen Peters, who began his career with the 1983 novel and HBO movie “The Park Is Mine,” starring Tommy Lee Jones.
Alcon’s co-presidents Andrew Kosove and Broderick Johnson are producing. Jack C. Merrick is exec producing. Plans are for the script to go out to directors shortly.





The movie will open in 1966 at the Quantico Marine Officer Basic School, when a contingent of South Vietnamese marines joins a class of 200 Americans. During five months of Allied combat training, Wells becomes friendly with two Vietnamese officers — one of whom is a master spy and secretly rejoins the North Vietnamese army upon returning to South Vietnam and becomes a colonel.
The colonel leads North Vietnamese troops during the 1968 battle for the impregnable Hue Citadel Fortress on the Perfume River. Wells and his two Quantico classmates become aware of each other’s presence — forcing the three of them to choose between duty and commitment to friendship.


FWD ALL FIELD UNITS--TUCAU, HADONG BRIDGE SECURITY, DODGE CITY, ARIZONA TERRITORY--

Sunday, March 27, 2016

27TH MARINES---KIA--VIETNAM

THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES RECORDS

Can be sorted by Name, Date of Casualty, Company, Battalion, Home Back in the World..

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Col Adolph Schwenk--C.O., 27th Marine Regt, Vietnam--(Korean War Duty as Capt.)--






LUBBOCK MORNING AVALANCHE--Jan 6, 1953--







OCR (Optical Character Recognition) decoded, unedited--


!Young Officer Loses Eye* In Combat 11. Patrol-05:20 Green . Ma e rin s .Shakes Up Chinese :Out ost • By ROBERT'S. ELEGANT- vital outioit "Hedy," .three-quart-WITH THE FIRST MARINE en of a.mile southwest of .much DIVISION IN KOREA, Dec. 27— fought-over Bunker Hill. • (Delayed by censor)—INS—This is ,•• • The Chinese were, enough not a hero story, though there is to throw hand grenades - into high valor in it. \ "Hedy" and sniped at /every It is the story• of an ordinary movement in. the- outpost.. One patrol of 20 Marines from Charley- man had been killed earlier that Company, 7th Marine Regiment, night no different from the nearly 60 patrols which fan out from Unit- "The Chinese were moving up gradually to take the outpost'? ed Nations divisions all.along the line every night of the• year. explained Marine Capt. Adolf The reinforced squad of 19 Schwenk, 30. Yonkers, N.Y.. %- credibly brave kids with rifles We couldn't let them have it and one light machinegun,. and led under. any -conditions. Hedy. corn-by :a ''green second . lieutenant mends enemy-held Bunker Bill and our 'bunker gate' to the. right struck out last night into the' black of Hedy. Behind Bunker Hill Is unknown which shrouds the pret-the tunnel—honeycombed fortresszel shaped main line. The Marines were ordered to mountain Teedoksan." throw back a Chinese unit which Come Under Heavy Fire The 22-year-old second lieuten-ant crept to within 90 yards of apt took the kids out througb a haze to the left of Hedy and down the ridge toward the Chi-nese. position. Directly behind the lieutenant walked a telephone man trailing a wire to the out-post and a walkie-talkie operator. As soon as they stepped out of the bunker, the Marines came under heavy fire from enemy mortars and automatic 'weapons. After a minute or two, the tele-phone man reported two "sting-ers" to Captain Schwenk *in the outpost. (Marines use the names of drinks as code names in .battle. "Stinger" was used to mean wounded in action.) "We were so close, we could hear the mortar shells leaving the tubes," Sgt. Paul H. Sheehan, 23. Boston. -Masi., told International' NeWs Service. . • "I still don't understand how they could drop in the rounds so short." 1 • . Laid Down Counter•Fire Grenades began to fall . around the patrol. But the green kids sot up the light, machine gun and laid down counter-fire. - The telephone man reported two more "stingers" before his instrument was shot out of his hand: One of the injured was the young lieutenant, who was hit in the eye. Sgt. Sheehan took command. He concentrated fire on the enemy pocket and called for mortar fire over the walkie-talkie. Then_ the pntenna was carried off the radio by a Mortar fragment and the. patrol was out of -touch with the observation post: Sheehan took a • "broruc" — nick on theiear by a mortar shell,' but the wound-was too minor to require evacuation. With the mortars and the pa-trol's own weapons raining. fire on them, the Chinese weakened. Boxed With Artillery After a few minutes. the .enemy "boxed" himself • with artillery' and mortar fire. Boxing is laying down a curtain• of fire around .a beleaguered unit. It is an extreme defense•measure. • After_ a.-.58:rninute firefight,. The patrol withdrew: They had -ful-filled their assigned_ mission: "Shake up. the= enemy and' ease the threat to Hedy." • At 11:30 the kids came back carrying their wounded. "They ran a good patrol," com-mented • Capt. Schwenk. "Just another patrol. But a good one." "I understand my young. lieu-tenant is-going tolose his eye but will be all right otherwise." the Marine offieer:continued.."If You see him, telPhim..the skipper said he did a good. job — he'll under-stand."